Ghislaine Maxwell Moved To Low-Security Florida Prison

Ghislaine Maxwell Moved To Low-Security Florida Prison

Former Jeffrey Epstein confidant Ghislaine Maxwell has been moved to a low-security prison in Tallahassee, Florida.

Maxwell, who is serving a 20-year prison sentence, has been relocated to the Federal Correctional Institute (FCI) Tallahassee by the Bureau of Prisons (BOP), The Daily Mail first reported.

In December 2021, Maxwell was found guilty on five of six federal charges in relation to her dealings with Epstein, including conspiracy to entice and transport individuals under 17 to travel in interstate commerce with intent to engage in “illegal sexual activity.”

During her trial, the public learned more about how Epstein and Maxwell would prey on the girls they abused.

One of Maxwell’s accusers, a woman testifying under the pseudonym “Jane,” testified that Epstein and Maxwell abused her together when she was just 14 years old. Maxwell took her on shopping trips, asked her about her life, and discussed sexual topics with her, “Jane” said.

Maxwell’s attorneys requested that she serve her jail time in Danbury, Connecticut. Federal Judge Alison Nathan recommended that location, but BOP denied the request.

The Tallahassee prison is an all-female institution with a wide variety of recreational activities that Maxwell will be allowed to participate in while serving her time.

The Daily Mail noted that Maxwell would have access to events like yoga, pilates, weights, softball, flag football, and frisbee. The British outlet indicated that she could also partake in a prison talent show.

Likewise, Maxwell can enter into apprenticeship programs to learn skills related to several vocations if she so desires.

Maxwell is now 60 years old and has been kept in the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn, New York.

In June, Maxwell’s lawyers alleged in court documents that another inmate in the same prison housing unit as Maxwell was offered money to murder her.

The explosive claim was revealed in a report from The New York Times. The lawyers said that following her conviction, Maxwell was moved to the prison’s general population and became a “target of a credible death threat from a fellow inmate.”

“A prisoner in Ms. Maxwell’s housing unit told at least three other inmates that she had been offered money to murder Ms. Maxwell and that she planned to strangle Ms. Maxwell in her sleep, the lawyers wrote,” the Times noted. “The inmate who made the threat was moved to a different unit, ‘presumably to protect Ms. Maxwell,’” the lawyers said.

 

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