John Fetterman: ‘My Name Is… John Fetterwoman!’

John Fetterman: ‘My Name Is… John Fetterwoman!’

Pennsylvania Lt. Governor and Democratic Senate nominee John Fetterman misgendered himself in a moment of purposeful pandering that left social media cringing.

During a rally near Philadelphia that featured local and national leadership of Planned Parenthood, the official brandished a hot pink t-shirt emblazoned with the word “Fetterwoman” in the same font as his campaign logo.

Democratic Senate candidate John Fetterman: “My name is John Fetterwoman!”pic.twitter.com/7q0S3NNYAI

— Daily Wire (@realDailyWire) September 12, 2022

A handful of conservatives on social media mocked the bizarre stunt. “The CRINGE will melt your face off,” Newsmax commentator Benny Johnson said.

During the event, Fetterman and top abortion activists blasted Republican Senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz for calling abortion “murder” at the early stages of pregnancy — although the candidate’s campaign said that he supports exemptions for rape, incest, and life of the mother. “Women are the reason we can win,” Fetterman remarked. “Don’t piss women off.”

Planned Parenthood CEO Alexis McGill Johnson labeled Oz a “charlatan” who “would be a rubber stamp for Mitch McConnell.” The conglomerate has committed $50 million to elect pro-abortion politicians in swing states such as Pennsylvania, Michigan, Georgia, and Arizona.

Other footage from a Labor Day address showed Fetterman stumbling and slurring through his speech. The former mayor of Braddock, Pennsylvania, suffered a stroke days before the commonwealth’s primary election and was absent for months during his recovery.

In case you were wondering why John Fetterman’s handlers won’t let him debate… pic.twitter.com/YXTkoweNBz

— Greg Price (@greg_price11) September 12, 2022

Fetterman’s cardiologist, Ramesh Chandra, said in a letter published after the primary election that the candidate had not visited his office since 2017, despite his atrial fibrillation — a condition that causes an irregular heart rhythm and decreased heart pump. As long as the candidate takes his medication, eats healthy, and stays active, Chandra believes “he’ll be fine” on the campaign trail and in Congress.

Fetterman told The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in July that he felt “really good” and has no “physical limits.” After the candidate repeatedly shirked Oz, a celebrity cardiologist, with respect to a televised debate, the paper’s editorial board questioned his fitness in an opinion piece.

“If Mr. Fetterman’s communication skills have not yet recovered sufficiently to effectively debate his opponent, many voters will have concerns about his ability to represent them effectively in Washington,” the editorial board contended. “While he has gamely undertaken more campaign events and media interviews in recent weeks, Mr. Fetterman still speaks haltingly and relies on closed captioning to fully understand his conversation partners.”

The editorial board also noted the unpredictable nature of stroke recovery. “Mr. Fetterman’s campaign asserts confidently that he will make a full recovery, and that he is doing the hard work — including speech therapy — to accelerate that recovery,” the piece added. “The campaign’s early predictions proved optimistic; the more recent predictions of ‘several months’ to a ‘complete recovery’ may prove optimistic, too.”

Fetterman told Politico last week that he “absolutely” plans to debate Oz, noting that his campaign has been working to address “some of the lingering issues of the stroke, the auditory processing, and we’re going to be able to work that out.”

Fetterman did not clarify details of the debate, although he told the outlet that it would occur “sometime in the middle to end of October” on a “major television station” in Pennsylvania. Oz also noticed the lack of specificity, commenting on social media that “Fetterman sure has a lot of people speaking for him, but does very little speaking himself.”

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