‘Of Course You’re Scared’: James Woods Mocks New York Times For Calling New GOP Rep. Flores ‘Far-Right Latina’

‘Of Course You’re Scared’: James Woods Mocks New York Times For Calling New GOP Rep. Flores ‘Far-Right Latina’

Outspoken conservative actor James Woods bashed The New York Times after the paper ranted that new Rep. Mayra Flores (R-TX) is a “far-Right Latina.”

Flores flipped a district in the Rio Grande Valley to the Republican Party and became the first Latina Republican to be sent to Congress from Texas.  In an article titled “The Rise of the Far-Right Latina,” The Times wrote hopefully, “Her abbreviated term lasts only through the end of the year, and she is seen as a long shot to win re-election to a full one.”

“You scared, guys?” Woods tweeted. “She ran on family, hard work, and patriotic values. Oh, right. Of course you’re scared.”

You scared, guys? She ran on family, hard work, and patriotic values. Oh, right. Of course you’re scared. pic.twitter.com/coPQ1L1Q3B

— James Woods (@RealJamesWoods) July 6, 2022

“Her campaign slogan — ‘God, family, country’ — was meant to appeal to what she calls the ‘traditional values’ of her majority-Hispanic district in the border city of Brownsville,” the Times mocked disdainfully.  “She called for President Biden’s impeachment. She tweeted QAnon hashtags. And she called the Democratic Party the ‘greatest threat America faces.’”

Flores was elected to fill the vacancy left after a Democratic congressman retired. She will seek reelection in November for a full term, running against Rep. Vicente Gonzalez (D-TX). “Democratic leaders are optimistic that Mr. Gonzalez will defeat Ms. Flores,” The Times puffed.

The Times predictably quoted a Latino Democratic representative who patronized that Flores’ victory was a “public relations coup” for Republicans. “It does not mean she represents mainstream Hispanic voters,” Rep. Ruben Gallego (D-AZ) condescended.

In June, a poll from Quinnipiac University asked Hispanic respondents, “If the election were today, would you want to see the Republican Party or the Democratic Party win control of the United States House of Representatives?”

Respondents favored Republicans by 3 percentage points, 41% to 38%.

“The results show a staggering swing from the results of the 2018 midterms” when “an estimated 69% of Latinos voted for the Democratic candidate and 29% backed the Republican candidate, a more than two-to-one advantage for Democrats, according to National Election Pool exit poll data,” The Daily Wire reported. “These results largely reflect the party affiliation of Latinos. In a Pew Research Center pre-election survey, 62% of Latinos said they identify with or lean toward the Democratic Party compared with 27% who affiliated with the Republican Party.”

In May, a Quinnipiac University poll found President Biden’s support among Hispanics had plummeted in the last 12 months to less than half of his approval numbers the year before.

Quinnipiac University’s poll in May 2021 found Biden’s approval rating among Hispanics riding high at 55%. But the poll released in May 2022 revealed that number had plunged to 26%, barely more than a quarter of Hispanics.

“Biden is less popular among Hispanics than any other demographic, including age and gender,” Fox News noted of the poll’s results.

A paltry 27% of Hispanics approved of Biden’s economic policies, a percentage even lower than the 32% of Americans nationwide. Hispanics ranked inflation as the most pressing issue concerning them.

In March, Axios reported that their poll showed inflation had replaced COVID as the major source of concern among Hispanics.

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