‘Perhaps A Lover?’: Whoopi Goldberg Hints Republicans Who Voted For Marriage Bill Were Threatened To Do So

“The View” co-host Whoopi Goldberg suggested that all of the Republicans who voted in favor of the so-called Respect for Marriage Act may have done so at the stern behest of a friend — or “perhaps a lover.”

During Wednesday’s broadcast of the long-running ABC midday talk show, Goldberg and her co-hosts discussed the legislation — which President Joe Biden signed into law on Tuesday in a lavish ceremony that included drag queens, among others.

Damned if you do, damned if you don’https://t.co/CXBiiovtrY Behar suggests Congressional Republicans opposed to the Respect for Marriage Act are also against interracial marriage.
Whoopi suggests Republicans who did vote for it did so at the behest of a secret gay lover. pic.twitter.com/gcWhSPC499

— Nicholas Fondacaro (@NickFondacaro) December 14, 2022

Co-host Joy Behar was first to address the topic, and she complained about the Republicans who had not voted to federally codify same-sex marriage. She asked whether those same people have also been opposed to interracial marriage, which was also federally protected under the new law.

“Does that mean that these Republicans who are against the gay marriage bill are also against interracial marriage?” she asked, and her co-hosts all began talking at once.

“No, it’s not that,” Republican co-host Alyssa Farah Griffin cut in, adding in exaggerated tones. “It’s the fear of like polyamory or, like, you’re going to marry a relative … I mean, I think.”

“That must be the slippery slope. Bestiality? Is that what they’re thinking?” co-host Sunny Hostin asked, prompting loud laughter from the audience.

Griffin went on to argue that straight couples were more likely to damage traditional marriage than same-sex couples were, and Goldberg promptly agreed: “That’s the biggest threat.”

“Anytime somebody decides that they want to get married, celebrate them,” Goldberg insisted, going on to claim that putting rules on marriage was like “giving the finger” to same-sex couples who were already married.

“And I suspect many of these folks voted the way they did because somebody they know said, ‘If you don’t vote this way, I’ll never speak to you again,’” Goldberg concluded, apparently suggesting that some Republicans may have only voted in favor of the measure under duress. “Perhaps a lover? Maybe a friend.”

Across both legislative chambers, a total of 51 Republicans voted to pass the Respect for Marriage Act — 39 of them in the House of Representatives and 12 in the Senate.

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