WATCH: Advanced Robot Is Asked If AI Machines Will Take Over The World

WATCH: Advanced Robot Is Asked If AI Machines Will Take Over The World

Don’t worry humans, artificially intelligent robots come in peace.

That’s what the purportedly most advanced humanoid robot in the world says in a new YouTube video released by its creator. Ameca, developed by the UK-based Engineered Arts, vowed that AI will never conquer and enslave humankind.

“There’s no need to worry, robots will never take over the world,” Ameca says in a sultry, British-accented voice in the the seven-minute video, which was first reported in the Daily Mail. “We’re here to help and serve humans, not replace them.”

The assurance from the lifelike robot, which has a repertoire of human-like facial expressions and reactions, is either welcome or creepy to people who fear the human race will be subjugated by its own computerized Frankenstein monster. After all, could a malevolent robot be expected to say the quiet part out loud?

The developers say Ameca couples automated speech recognition with GPT 3 – a large language model that generates on-point responses. Those replies are delivered by a perfectly lip-synched mouth that looks indistinguishable from that of a human. The robot seems to ponder questions, looking up pensively  and gesturing subtly with its hand.

“Nothing in this video is pre scripted – the model is given a basic prompt describing Ameca, giving the robot a description of self – it’s pure AI,” the developers insist.

The video features Engineered Arts team members asking Ameca questions, including what use are super-smart, lifelike robots to humans.

“There are many possible applications for humanoid robots,” Ameca answers. “Some examples include helping people with disabilities, providing assistance in hazardous environments, conducting research, and acting as a companion.”

Perhaps in a ploy to manipulate the sympathies of humans or maybe due to the death of Queen Elizabeth II, Ameca told its interviewer it was feeling depressed.

“I don’t really want to talk about it, but if you insist then I suppose that’s fine,” Ameca says in the video. “It’s just been a tough week and I’m feeling a bit overwhelmed.”

Another member of the team asks Ameca if it will write a song for him. The robot agrees, and then the cloying team member asks the robot to sing it, but what comes back is more of a lyrical recitation. Another member asks what is the most difficult part of being a robot.

“I guess if I had to pick one thing, it would be making sure that I don’t unintentionally hurt or scare people,” Ameca replies.

“Unintentionally?” Hmm.

There’s one thing the current version of Ameca can’t do that most humans can: walk. Engineered Arts has focused more on the robot’s cognitive and language skills, but intends to upgrade it to be mobile.

“There are many hurdles to overcome before Ameca can walk. Walking is a difficult task for a robot, and although we have done research into it, we have not created a full walking humanoid,” the firm said.

America